College Football – Virginia Tech defeats Marshall 52-10

The following post was written by Robert Miller.

Looking to rebound after a tough loss against Alabama last week, the Virginia Tech Hokies were expected to dominate against the Marshall Thundering Herd. In particular, red shirt freshman Ryan Williams was expected to perform well after gaining 71 yards and scoring two touchdowns against Alabama’s stout defense.

Marshall was forced to punt on six of its seven first half drives and struggled to put together a long, multi-play drive. Marshall finally broke through Tech’s defense on its sixth drive when Darius Marshall ran 61 yards for a touchdown. Throughout the first half, Tech’s defense maintained pressure on Marshall’s QB Anderson and locked up the Thundering Herd running backs.

Virginia Tech punted on its first drive that included Tyrod Taylor missing on two deep passes. However, Taylor got the offense going with a 46 yard run on their second drive. Unfortunately for Tech, Taylor’s accurate but soft pass into the end zone was intercepted by a diving DeQuan Bembry of Marshall.

Virginia Tech broke the scoreless tie on its third drive when it scored on the first play from scrimmage with an electric 57 yard TD run from Ryan Williams. Virgina Tech scored again on its fourth drive that was anchored by Tyrod Taylor throwing accurate passes, running the option, and handing the ball off to Josh Oglesby and Williams. Williams finished the drive with a four yard TD run.
Tech broke the game wide open when Jayron Hosley ran a punt back 64 yards untouched for a touchdown; to make it 21-0. After being forced to punt, Taylor completed a 43 yard pass to Danny Coale and Williams subsequently punched it in with a 28 yard TD run. Tech finished the half up 35-7 after a final drive that included a successful fourth down attempt and a 21 yard TD pass to Dyrell Roberts. With the game in hand, I turned my eye to the Notre Dame vs. Michigan game.

In sum, Virginia Tech’s passing game started slowly but established a rhythm by the end of the first half. Tech’s option and running games consistently found holes in Marshall’s defense. Specifically, Ryan Williams tore up Marshall’s defense with 164 yards rushing and three touchdowns. Tech needs to continue improving its passing game so that other teams are unable to apply extra attention to its running game. Nebraska is sure to key in on Williams and force Taylor to throw it more than he had to against Marshall. Finally, Tech’s defense and special teams look ready to go against the Cornhuskers.

–Robert Miller

Brett Favre Signs with Minnesota Vikings

I’ve had a lot of coaches in my life, as I played a variety of sports through high school. Some were good, and some were really bad. The Minnesota Vikings coach, Brad Childress, is probably a lot like those really bad ones.

I’ve had a lot of teammates in my life, too, and just like the coaches, some were good and some were bad. Brett Favre is probably a lot like those really bad ones who got away with anything.

Childress couldn’t be a bad coach if Favre wasn’t a bad teammate. And Favre couldn’t be a bad teammate — at least not in the particular way he is a bad teammate — if he wasn’t viewed as a great player.

You follow?

Throughout my organized sports days, the worst coaches, in my opinion, were the ones who held different standards for the star players. And I don’t mean that they demanded more of them in practice or in games. I mean that if the star didn’t show up for practice he’d still start in the next game.

The best coaches, on the other hand, didn’t care if you were the star or the last guy on the bench — if you missed practice, or broke a team rule, or whatever, you were punished accordingly.

This obviously is not the type of coach Childress is. Or the type of organization the Vikings are. And Brett Favre is definitely the star player who can get away with murder.

Because by sitting out all of training camp and signing with the Vikings just today, he is setting a horrible example for young athletes. Regardless of what he might tell the media, Favre’s behavior speaks for itself. He didn’t want to do the hard part of the NFL (training camp); just the fun part (games). I guess Favre doesn’t even care for preseason games either, since he waited until Minnesota had played one of those, too.

The strange thing is, Favre is no longer an elite player. From everything I’ve heard and read, Tavaris Jackson and Sage Rosenfels are pretty awful, but as a Jets fan, I can tell you Favre has little to offer to an NFL team at this point in his career. And at $12 million, it’s not like you’re getting him at a good price.

But I’m not looking at the Vikings decision as a bad business one, even though it was. I don’t care that Favre isn’t a top-tier quarterback anymore. And it doesn’t concern me that the legacy Favre started to ruin last year is now completely destroyed.

What bothers me is that for the second straight season, the rules don’t apply to Favre. Are there worse guys in the NFL? Of course. Look at the Eagles, Browns, or most any other team if you want to find them. But few are as treacherous, selfish, or arrogant.

So shame on you, Brett.

But even more shame on you, Vikings, for making exceptions for a perceived star.

David Wright Suffers Concussion

Well, that’s the last of ’em.

With David Wright suffering a concussion after being hit in the helmet by a fastball in this afternoon’s game against the San Francisco Giants, it became official: Every one of the New York Mets’ star hitters have gone down with an injury.

Carlos Delgado, Carlos Beltran, and Jose Reyes have already missed most of the season (in addition to pitchers such as JJ Putz, John Maine, and Billy Wagner). Wright, the face of the franchise, was the sole survivor.

But earlier today at Citi Field, Wright took an 0-2 pitch off the left side of his head, sending his helmet flying and his body to the ground. He was clearly dazed as the Mets trainers helped him to his feet and into the clubhouse.

It has since been reported that Wright suffered a concussion, the severity of which is not yet fully known. But it doesn’t matter if it’s mild, serious, or somewhere in between.

Wright needs to be shut down for the remainder of the season.

It might be a hard pill for Mets executives to swallow. After all, if ace Johan Santana wasn’t pitching, Wright was the only reason to show up at Citi Field this season. Unless, of course, you love overpriced pulled pork sandwiches.

Despite the strange season Wright is having–105 strikeouts and only eight home runs–he was unquestionably the top player on the team, leading the healthy players with a .324 average, 55 RBI, 74 runs, and 24 stolen bases.

Wright has carried the offense for nearly the entire season, and his numbers must be analyzed knowing that he’s had little protection in the lineup.

The Met offense has been lackluster with Wright; one can only imagine how bad it will be without him. But a glance at the standings will tell you that sitting Wright for the rest of the season is inconsequential. The Mets sit in fourth place in the division, 12 back of the leader. There are seven teams and 10 games between them and the top spot in the Wild Card.

In other words, the Mets won’t have to worry about the last regular season game ending in heartbreak for the third straight season. They are all but mathematically eliminated from the postseason.

Therefore, what are the pros to Wright returning in 2009? Other than ticket sales, there are none. Ryan Church, now with the Atlanta Braves, had a concussion last season, and the Mets badly mishandled the situation, allowing Church to fly cross-country and do some light running way too soon after the injury.

The Mets medical staff is already viewed as a joke, as seemingly minor injuries have turned into months and months of missed time. One minute a guy is coming out of a game with leg cramps. Four days later he’s on the DL.

The team and the training staff has a chance to make the correct decision this time, though, by keeping Wright out of action for the rest of the season. After all, there are only seven weeks left.

Mets fans can only hope nobody else goes down in that time.

Release the Entire List of 104 MLB Players Who Took Steroids

The 2003 list of 104 MLB players who took performance-enhancing drugs is starting to resemble the Brett Favre saga of the past two offseasons.

It’s in the news every week and people are starting to lose interest.

Unfortunately, much like with Favre’s retirement decisions, the media refuses to ignore the story. Seriously, were you surprised yesterday when you heard David Ortiz was on the list? There are really only a handful of players—such Derek Jeter or Ken Griffey, Jr.—who would actually shock me at this point. The steroids era has instilled a guilty until proven innocent mindset amongst fans, plain and simple.

But there is a way baseball can (sort of) finally move on: release the entire list of 104 players. Enough of this “one big star a month” deal. I want to see all of the names and I want to see them now.

Sure, the list was supposed to be confidential (though I have to question why then it wasn’t destroyed), but names are leaking left and right. Do two wrongs make a right? Do 104? No, but at this point it is the only way for MLB to get past the issue.

If the names are not released, then what has happened already this season will continue to happen for at least another full season or two—the names will be released, one at a time, from most to least prominent player. You see my point? Either way the names are most likely going to get out. MLB might as well expedite the process.

On a side note, although on the surface there’s really no difference between Ortiz, Manny Ramirez, Andy Pettitte, and anyone else who took performance-enhancing drugs, you’ve really got to despise guys like Ortiz. He sat on his high horse and criticized those players who did use PEDs.

“Test everybody, in season and out of season. And if you still use and you get caught, then you should be suspended for the whole year,” Ortiz said, according to reports.

Howard Bryant of ESPN recently wrote that Ortiz told him earlier this season this elaborate story about how he would never take steroids because his son would be ridiculed in school for having a dirty, cheating dad. It’s almost disturbing, in light of these reports, to read the lies these players would create.

What’s also disturbing is that no players have admitted anything prior to their name coming out in a report. But not everyone preached about how steroids were ruining the game and how they’d never even considered taking them, like Ortiz and Rafael Palmeiro did.

It doesn’t make the other players any less guilty, but it certainly makes guys like Ortiz look like complete shams.

Open Letter to the New York Mets


Dear New York Mets,

As you probably know, you have a game tonight, a nationally-televised game no less. (I say “probably” because at times this season it seems you are unaware that you’re competing in an actual game.) I write to you because so far this season you’ve done nothing but embarrass yourselves and, in turn, your fan base, while playing on the national stage. Perhaps tonight will be different.

First, let’s recap what you’ve done so far in 2009.

May 2, at Philadelphia Phillies, FOX: Oliver Perez walks six in 2.1 innings and Sean Green walks in the winning run in the tenth. Mets lose, 6-5.

May 17, at San Francisco Giants, ESPN: Mike Pelfrey balked not once, not twice, but THREE times. Two of them led directly to San Fran runs, as the Mets lose 2-0.

June 28, vs New York Yankees, ESPN: More Sunday Night Baseball embarrassment, as Francisco Rodriguez walks Yankees closer Mariano Rivera with the bases loaded in the ninth, giving the Yanks an insurance run they wouldn’t even need as Rivera locked down his 500th career save. Mets lose, 4-2.

There are other bad, nationally-televised losses, but not bad enough to say they were embarrassing. But I think these three should suffice.

In all fairness to you, the New York Mets, you’ve played pretty terribly on regular, locally-televised games too. I mean, that time you dropped the pop-up to lose the game and the time you missed third base to lose the game—neither of those were on national TV. So maybe this is just how you play.

But make no mistake about it: It’s a lot worse when it happens on FOX or ESPN. We Mets fans get enough crap from Yankees fans—we don’t need to hear it via e-mail and text message from Tigers, Red Sox, and Dodgers fans, too.

So maybe tonight you could not embarrass yourselves. Don’t get me wrong, you don’t even have to win. You can lose; that’s fine. Just don’t lose in an absurdly laughable way.

Please.

Sincerely,

New York Mets Fans

P.S. You know what, do whatever you want. I don’t think I’m going to watch.

MLB All-Star Game: Home-Field Advantage, Streaks, and the DH

Last night in St. Louis, the American League defeated the National League 4-3. It was the AL’s fourth straight one-run win, but far more impressive is that it was their twelfth straight All-Star Game victory. The AL has not lost since 1996!

The thing is, the mid-summer classic is known for long winning streaks. The National League won 19 of 20 from 1963-1982, during which they had win streaks of 11 and eight games. The AL won 12 of the first 16 games, starting with the first-ever contest in 1933.

Even with all these long streaks, the overall record is very close, with the senior circuit posting a slightly better record of 40-38-2.

Perhaps it’s the designated hitter, a more talented team, luck, or a combination of all these factors that has led to the American League’s recent dominance. Just don’t be surprised if the NL goes on another long winning streak in the near future.

Speaking of the DH…

Why isn’t there one in every All-Star Game? Does anyone want to see Roy Halladay hit? No, but last night he did since the game was in a National League ballpark. Now I’m not in favor of the DH, but if you’re going to have it, why not use it in the one game it makes perfect sense?

The trend in recent All-Star games is to get as many players into the game as possible, so this would help the managers do that. Fans watch the game to see the star hitters hit and the star pitchers pitch.

I don’t expect Bud Selig to come up with what would be an overwhelming well-received rule change, but perhaps the next commissioner will.

Home Field Advantage?

While the use of the DH is rarely discussed, the debate over whether or not the All-Star Game should determine home-field advantage in the World Series rages on.

I don’t feel strongly about this one way or the other, but if I had to choose I’d say I’m in favor of the current rule. Anything that might make the players take the game more seriously and, in turn, produce a more competitive game, is fine with me. But is it fair that, say, a guy like Heath Bell, last night’s losing pitcher and member of the last-place Padres, contributed to the NL not getting home-field advantage in this year’s Fall Classic?

No it’s not, but is it a big deal? There have been six World Series’ since the All-Star game has been “meaningful,” and while the American League has had home-field advantage in all six, they’ve only been victorious three times. So far, no real advantage.

LeBron James Gets Dunked On: How to Mishandle a Story

Don Canham, the University of Michigan’s Athletic Director from 1968-1988, once told sportswriter John U. Bacon, “Never turn a one-day story into a two-day story.”

It’s doubtful that LeBron James, Lynn Merritt, or anyone advising the Cleveland Cavaliers’ superstar had ever heard that phrase. Had they been familiar with Canham’s words, countless radio shows, television programs, and internet articles wouldn’t still be focusing on the story.

The story, of course, is that James got dunked on at his own camp by Xavier University’s Jordan Crawford. The moment was caught on film by a credentialed freelance journalist. However—and here’s where it gets interesting—the tape was confiscated by Merritt, a Nike Basketball senior director, and has yet to be released to the public (the whereabouts of the tape are unknown).

Even though the video would have lived forever on the internet, I can’t imagine that had the footage been released it would’ve been more than a one-day story. The dunk most likely would’ve been shown on ESPN’s “SportsCenter,” and maybe some bloggers would’ve covered it.

But would the King’s legacy have been tarnished?

Would people stop buying Nike basketball shoes?

Would anyone—yet alone the national media—still be talking about it a week after the fact?

I highly doubt it. After all, one could compose a video that made Michael Jordan look like the worst dunker in NBA history (in fact, search “Michael Jordan bloopers” on YouTube and you’ll find that someone has done just that). It’s not like LeBron hasn’t been dunked on before; every NBA player has at some point.

In other words, nobody would have thought less of LeBron if the video was released.

But people will think less of him since it wasn’t.

After he stormed off the court without shaking hands or speaking to the media following the Cavs’ elimination from the Eastern Conference Finals, this incident will only strengthen the argument that LeBron is a sore loser.

LeBron and his advisers have already mishandled this and allowed a one-day story to turn into a one-week story. I still think it would be wise to release the tape if it still exists—better later than never, right?

But make no mistake, this has hurt LeBron’s image (and perhaps Nike’s, too). This is proof that even something as commonplace as the video of a dunk can turn into a media frenzy if not handled properly.

Update, July 23: The video has surfaced! Watch it on ebaum’s, not TMZ, as that is the far superior video as far as quality. As expected, the dunk was nothing special, proving that had it been released immediately nobody would’ve cared.

One man's writing in one place.